Emergency Management Plan FAQ

1. What are the Town of Cambridge Local Emergency Management Arrangements?

The Town of Cambridge has prepared Local Emergency Management Arrangements (2013) in conjunction with the Western Central Local Emergency Committee. The following local governments are a member of the Western Central Local Emergency Management Committee (WCLEMC), to participate in regional Emergency Management Arrangements:

  1. Cambridge
  2. Claremont
  3. Cottesloe
  4. Mosman Park
  5. Nedlands
  6. Peppermint Grove
  7. Subiaco
  8. Vincent

The local governments listed above, participating in the Western Central Local Emergency Management Committee available, accept and will carry out their role and responsibilities in the recovery process as outlined in the Emergency Management Act 2005.

View the current Western Central Local Emergency Management Arrangements

2. What happens in an emergency?

Emergency management in Western Australia is managed at three levels:

  1. State
  2. District;
  3. and Local (Local Government)

The State has adopted a comprehensive approach to risk management based on the prevention, preparedness, response and recovery model. 

There are prescribed natural and man-made hazards in Western Australia – including but not limited to the following:

  • Aircraft crash
  • Chemical or biological substances
  • Collapses - cliff, landform or building
  • Cyclone
  • Crashes- rail, vehicles
  • Disruption to liquid fuel, gas, electricity or water supply
  • Earthquake
  • Heatwave conditions
  • Fire
  • Flooding
  • Search- land and maritime
  • Severe storm
  • Space re-entry
  • Tsunami
  • Terrorist related activities.

Under the Western Australia Emergency Management Act 2005 and the State Emergency Management Arrangements a hazard management agency (HMA) has been identified to lead the response for each of the 27 prescribed hazards (for example: Department of Fire and Emergency Services are responsible for fire emergency response). The HMA and any support emergency responders will address the emergency with the view to protect life and property.

3. What is the function of local government in an emergency?

The function of local government in emergency management is to:

  • ensure effective Local Emergency Management Arrangements (LEMA) are prepared and maintained for its district,
  • manage recovery following an emergency affecting the community in its district, and
  • perform other functions given to local government under the Emergency Management Act 2005.

In addition, the Town of Cambridge will assist the emergency responders with the provision of local knowledge, available resources on a needs basis and, if requested, access to facilities to establish a local welfare (evacuation) centre. The Town will also assist with the communications and liaison between emergency responders and residents.

4. Who approves the Local Emergency Management Arrangements?

The function of local government in emergency management is to:

  • ensure effective Local Emergency Management Arrangements (LEMA) are prepared and maintained for its district;
  • manage recovery following an emergency affecting the community in its district, and 
  • perform other functions given to local government under the Emergency Management Act 2005.

In addition, the Town of Cambridge will assist the emergency responders with the provision of local knowledge, available resources on a needs basis and, if requested, access to facilities to establish a local welfare (evacuation) centre. The Town will also assist with the communications and liaison between emergency responders and residents.

5. What will happen in a large scale emergency?

In the case of a large scale emergency, where the Hazard Management Agency determines that members of the community must be evacuated for their safety, the Incident Controller will task the Department of Child Protection and Family Support (CPFS) to provide welfare support.

CPFS will then communicate with the Town of Cambridge for support in accordance with their Local Welfare Plan. The Town will work with the Department of Child Protection and Family Support and other agencies (Police, Fire, Medical etc) and assist where necessary with the following actions:

  • Assist with evacuation procedures;
  • Provision of local welfare centres and shelters;
  • Information hubs for affected residents;
  • Community liaison and engagement;
  • Coordination of services and emergency assessments for residents;
  • Recovery planning and implementation, including the appointment of a Local recovery Coordinator;
  • Post recovery assessment and reviews. 
6. What welfare arrangements are in place during an emergency?

As part of the Local Emergency Management Plan for the provision of welfare support, the Town of Cambridge has identified potential Welfare Centres within its boundaries that may be opened if the evacuation of the community is required, as follows:

  1. Wembley Community - Centre 40 Alexander Street Wembley; and
  2. Leederville Town Hall - 84 Cambridge Street, West Leederville.

Other venues currently being considered and the list of Centres will be increased.

7. What partnership agreements exist to effectively respond to an emergency?

When an emergency is declared in Western Australia, the Department of Child Protection and Family Support (CPFS) will appoint a Local Welfare Coordinator as the primary controller of any welfare actions contained in the Local Emergency Management Arrangements.

This may include the establishment and operation of local welfare centres (evacuation centres).

8. What is the local emergency management committee (LEMC)?

The LEMC is a non-operational committee that includes key stakeholders in emergency management (including emergency responders) that operate within the Town of Cambridge boundaries. The LEMC is established under the provisions of the Emergency Management Act 2005 and is responsible for:

  1. Preparing and maintaining the Local Emergency Management Arrangements for use as the main coordinating tool for the response to; and to assist the community to recover from; emergency incidents in the local area (local government boundaries);
  2. Promoting community awareness about emergency management issues and the community’s role in preparing for emergencies;
  3. Maintaining a forum for cooperation between Local Emergency coordinators, Hazard Management Agencies, Combat Agencies, Support Agencies, local governments and other relevant stakeholders on emergency management in the area; and testing of the Local Emergency Management Arrangements in partnership with significant facilities and relevant organisations; and
  4. Test the Local Emergency Management Arrangements annually to ensure their effectiveness and currency. 
9. Legislation and reference material

Visit the State Emergency Management Committee and the Office of Emergency Management website to view the following documents:

  • State Emergency Management Act (WA) 2005 
  • State Emergency Management - A Strategic Framework for Emergency Management in WA 
  • Publications, reference material and updated information on emergency management within Western Australia.